Episode 4

Ep.4: Shock n Awe, Damage Control

Feb 19, 2020

Welcome back to Match on a Fire. Today we’re covering the second half of our Shock series. Of the four different types of shock, today we are focusing on hemorrhagic shock. Why do we have to be aggressive when we treat it? What is the triad of death? What are the five parts of “damage control” when it comes to hemorrhagic shock? How can we make sure we get them from the point of impact, back home?

Hosts & Guests

Shannon Sovndal, MD

Stephanie Sovndal, F-PC/FF

About This Episode

We are not academic-centered. We aren’t affiliated with any hospital or any education center. These stories and our knowledge is based on our 20+ years in the medical field. If you have any questions, comments, or concerns about things we’ve said or topics you want to discuss, please send us an email.

Talking Points:

  • A quick review of the four different types of shock, and the vicious circle of shock
  • What is hemorrhagic shock?
  • What is happening when someone goes into hemorrhagic shock?
  • How we were taught to treat shock
  • What kills trauma patients?
  • What is the triad of death?
  • How can hypothermia kill trauma patients?
  • The complications that come from a patient being acidotic
  • How does coagulopathy mean death for trauma patients?
  • The five parts of “damage control”
  • How to reverse the triad of death
  • What to look for when you read studies
  • What is the best solution for someone who has low blood pressure?
  • How saline affects the triad of death

Quotes/Tweets

 11:29 – “The other part of this is, when I become more stressed because of the trauma, my factors that remain does not work as well as they should. And that’s just from the stress of the trauma.” – Shannon Solvndal, on why coagulopathy can mean death for a trauma patient

 11:58 – “If you think about what our goal is, as providers, it’s really, ‘taking a patient from the moment of impact and getting them home.” – Shannon Solvndal

 07:53 – “We know of three things that kill trauma patients and they are in the geometric shape of a triangle.” – Steph Solvndal

 19:49 – “When our heart squeezes, one-third of the time it’s in systole and two-thirds of the time, it’s in diastole so squeeze, rest, rest…” – Steph Solvndal

 27:22 – “Some of the big things we should be focusing on pre-hospital–right, before we do the chest pump, before we do the high fives– is, we really need to make sure we’re being awesome at our hypothermia treatment. So just still make sure you still gotta get them trauma naked but then cover them back up. You should be sweating, not cause you’re nervous but you should be sweating in that ambulance because it’s hot.” – Steph Solvndal

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